Awkward flailings of an aspiring papyrologist. An Englishwoman abroad.

"Henry Tilney must know best" Northanger Abbey Chapter 11

My tracked tag is violetianthe without the dash.

RAVENCLAW
{ wear }
SHERLOCK'S SCARF
{ wear }
House Arryn
{ GAME OF THRONES }
CABIN CREW
{
WEAR }
PIGFARTS
IS REAL
{ Team StarKid }
BIG DAMN HEROES
{ You can't take the sky from me }

aelphabathropp:

howelljenkinspendragon:

date someone no one else you know has ever met. date a bedridden friend who lives in the country. date someone whose death knell sounds every time you want an excuse to get out of a social obligation. date bunbury.

 (via shakespearean-spunk)


reblogged 20 hours ago on 29 September 2014 WITH 115,444 notes »reblog
via capricorn-child // originally mindtriggers

thorinobsessed:

tuiteyfruityundead:

toddystuck:

elvenkingthrandy:

thecumbercookieaboveallothers:

mindtriggers:

THIS WILL BE SUCH A LONG MARATHON AND I AM SO READY

That’s prob about 12 hours

extended lotr alone is 11 hours and 22 minutes.

LOTR Extended = 681 minutes
Hobbit 1 Extended = 182 minutes
Hobbit 2 Extended = approx. 186 minutes
Let’s say Hobbit 3 Extended is at least 185 minutes

The full marathon run time will be around 1234 minutes, or 20 hours 30 minutes.

let’s weed out the weak ones

reblogged 20 hours ago on 29 September 2014 WITH 513 notes »reblog
via paratactician // originally ancientpeoples

μηδὲν ἄγαν.

"Nothing in excess"

- Inscription from the temple of Apollo at Delphi.

(via ancientpeoples)

 

reblogged 21 hours ago on 29 September 2014 WITH 2,231 notes »reblog
via sexycodicology // originally johanoosterman

johanoosterman:

Black manuscripts - actually on parchment that was painted black - are amongst the rarest manuscripts we have. At the end of the fifteenth century at the court of Burgundy they were popular for a while. Well known is the black hours in the Morgan Library, but barely known is the black manuscript in Brussels (KB 9085) with dance melodies. On a black ground the notes were drawn in silver while the text was written in gold. Underneath the golden text, silvery letters indicate the dance steps.

reblogged 21 hours ago on 29 September 2014 WITH 3,745 notes »reblog
via reachabovethetrees // originally archiemcphee

archiemcphee:

British-born, Italy-based sculptor Matthew Simmonds is an art-historian-turned-stone-carver who sculpts beautiful architectural interiors inside rough pieces of marble and stone. His pieces look like miniature classical monuments and temples, empty of people, but full of intricate details.

“To create a sculpture that catches the light and structure of a building and lets the eye wander, to feel that here my eye could live, here a part of me could stay, is a great achievement,“ writes Simmonds. “The sculptures give the viewer a different perspective on space. They look different from every viewpoint. You long to be in them, and they seem almost more meaningful for that.“

To view more of Matthew Simmonds’ intricate sculptures click here.

[via Colossal]

reblogged 22 hours ago on 29 September 2014 WITH 40 notes »reblog
via sexycodicology // originally medievalistsnet

reblogged 23 hours ago on 29 September 2014 WITH 3,289 notes »reblog
via sexycodicology // originally fuckyeahbookarts

reblogged 1 day ago on 29 September 2014 WITH 108 notes »reblog
via sexycodicology // originally smalkonijn

smalkonijn:

rabbit playing the trumpet

Medieval illuminated manuscript

Source: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.559595177438753.1073741826.452060571525548&type=1

reblogged 1 day ago on 28 September 2014 WITH 31 notes »reblog
via ffordefans // originally ffordefans

ffordefans:

This map is both a snapshot of London’s literary history and beautiful in its own right.

More than 250 novels were mined in order to make the Literary London Map, taken from the Literary London Art Collection.

It was created by graphic artist Dex in collaboration with interior designer Anna Burles.

reblogged 1 day ago on 28 September 2014 WITH 21,053 notes »reblog
via littlewiggy // originally steampunktendencies

steampunktendencies:

The Royal Greenhouses of Laeken (DutchKoninklijke Serres van LakenFrenchSerres Royales de Laeken), are a vast complex of monumental heated greenhouses in the park of the Royal Palace of Laeken in the north of Brussels. It is one of the major tourist attractions of the city.

The complex was commissioned by King Leopold II and designed by Alphonse Balat. Built between 1874 and 1895, the complex was finished with the completion of the so-called “Iron Church”, a domed greenhouse that would originally serve as the royal chapel. The total floor surface of this immense complex is 2.5 hectares (270,000 square feet). 800,000 liters (over 200,000 US gallons) of fuel oil are needed each year to heat the buildings.

The complex can only be visited during a two-week period in April–May each year, when most flowers are in full bloom.

Credits : [Wikipedia] [Olivier Polet] [Luc Viatour]